1. I offer all this detail not to show that my abortion was “justified” because of the productive decade that followed, and not because I think what I did in my twenties was per se more useful to society than propagating the species (though to be honest, I think it was, however small the impact of my work), but because there seems to be this cultural fantasy that, as Pollitt puts it, “ill-timed pregnancy” is a bump easily absorbed, a hurdle easily surmounted. It’s as if, she writes, “bearing and raising children is something [women] should be ready to do at any moment.” If childbirth is compulsory, women’s sexuality is what “defines them,” she continues, “not their brains and gifts and individuality and character, and certainly not their wishes or their ambitions or their will.” Put another way, gender equality is a hollow concept if a woman can’t control her fertility except by refraining from sex.
    — 

    Laurie Abraham, Complicated Choices Around Abortion - Abortion in the U.S. - Elle

    Great essay, worth reading in its entirety. Another favorite part:
    “It’s Pollitt who offers perhaps the most forgiving perspective on my abortion history, and who says something that seemed to resonate with a number of my friends and colleagues. ‘Women have to control their fertility for 30 years,’ she tells me, echoing a line from Pro. ‘Thirty years is a long time not to make mistakes.’”

     
  2. 13:53

    Notes: 482

    Reblogged from seachangeprogram

    Tags: abortionreproductive rightstexas

    image: Download

    seachangeprogram:

Great news from the Center for Reproductive Rights. They explain:

We’re thrilled that 13 clinics across Texas are allowed to reopen their doors today! This is a tremendous victory for Texas women.Our fight isn’t over – after all, half of the state’s clinics remain closed. But we’ll continue fighting until the rights of Texas women are restored. Thank you all for standing with us as we #FightBackTX!

More information on the court ruling here.

    seachangeprogram:

    Great news from the Center for Reproductive Rights. They explain:

    We’re thrilled that 13 clinics across Texas are allowed to reopen their doors today! This is a tremendous victory for Texas women.

    Our fight isn’t over – after all, half of the state’s clinics remain closed. But we’ll continue fighting until the rights of Texas women are restored. Thank you all for standing with us as we #FightBackTX!


    More information on the court ruling here.

     
  3. image: Download

    seachangeprogram:

 
     
  4. We have to stop categorizing abortions as justified or unjustified. The best thing you can do if you support reproductive rights is to force people to realize that abortion is common, and the most common abortion is a five-to-15-minute procedure elected early in the first trimester by someone who doesn’t want to be pregnant or have a child. It’s our job to say it’s O.K. if that’s the end of the story. It’s O.K. if it’s boring or not traumatic or if you don’t even know what it was.
    —  This is What an Abortion Looks Like, Merrit Tierce in the New York Times (via seachangeprogram)
     
  5. We can’t keep treating women who’ve had abortions like idiots who refuse to take basic precautions to prevent pregnancy. And we can’t keep stigmatizing women who’ve had more than one abortion, as if it proves something about their character, morals or intelligence.
     
  6. roxanegay:

    Supposedly, this is a first amendment issue. I see it as women’s bodies being sacrificed in favor of a gross misinterpretation. Those “counselors,” even with buffer zones are free to speak and protest. They are simply free to do so from thirty-five feet away. Apparently, that’s not enough. Apparently, they need to spew their righteous conviction all the way up to the front door of an abortion clinic. I choose to imagine they have this pathetic need because they know they will never stop women from doing what they need to do when it comes to their bodies. 

    I’m tired of certain kinds of freedom and especially the willful freedom of our elected officials to enable such disregard for women’s rights and for the sanctity of women’s bodies and spirits.

     
  7. rcsolstice:

    choctawaukerman:

    Today the US Supreme Court struck down a Massachusetts bill that gave abortion/family planning clinics as 35 foot protection zone in which protestors could not harass clinic patients, opening patients to the possibility of harassment, verbal and physical attacks, and even death threats as they attempt to enter a clinic.

    This is ridiculous. 

     
  8. Kate Cockrill, 36, and Steph Herold, 26, are the activists and entrepreneurs behind Sea Change, a new nonprofit that seeks to tackle the stigma around abortion and other reproductive experiences, such as adoption and infertility. “A few months back we got a package from a woman in Georgia,” Cockrill said. “In the package was the sweetest letter thanking us for our work. This woman had never told anyone about her abortion but had written a whole book about the isolation, shame and judgment she felt. She didn’t know who to send it to, so she sent it to us. The saddest thing about it: Her abortion was more than 25 years ago.”

    These Women Want to Change the Way You Think About Abortion

     
  9. image: Download

    rhrealitycheck:


"As we reflect on the 41st anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, we recommit ourselves to the decision’s guiding principle: that every woman should be able to make her own choices about her body and her health." - President Barack Obama

Thank you, Mr. President!Read the entire statement here: http://usat.ly/KHNZMd

    rhrealitycheck:

    "As we reflect on the 41st anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, we recommit ourselves to the decision’s guiding principle: that every woman should be able to make her own choices about her body and her health." - President Barack Obama

    Thank you, Mr. President!

    Read the entire statement here: http://usat.ly/KHNZMd

     
  10. I worked at McDonald’s and I spent the money I earned at McDonald’s to get my abortion. I was only fifteen and the person who got me pregnant did not want to give me any money. I was $40 short, so I had my drug dealer call him and threaten him, so he gave me the last $40.

    I really credit it as something that changed my life because I got a job, I took care of my business, and I moved on. And I’m not one of those people who’d have looked back and been like, Oh, that kid would be 30 right now… I don’t think, Oh, I really regret it… Maybe that’s a fucked-up thing to say but, I don’t regret it at all, number one, and number two, it was one of the best things that happened to me. Not actually being on the table and having it done, but feeling like I was responsible for my own life and realizing that when I made mistakes, there were consequences and that I could take care of those consequences. I could make mistakes and I could fix them. And live with them.