1. Kate Cockrill, 36, and Steph Herold, 26, are the activists and entrepreneurs behind Sea Change, a new nonprofit that seeks to tackle the stigma around abortion and other reproductive experiences, such as adoption and infertility. “A few months back we got a package from a woman in Georgia,” Cockrill said. “In the package was the sweetest letter thanking us for our work. This woman had never told anyone about her abortion but had written a whole book about the isolation, shame and judgment she felt. She didn’t know who to send it to, so she sent it to us. The saddest thing about it: Her abortion was more than 25 years ago.”

    These Women Want to Change the Way You Think About Abortion

     
  2. image: Download

    rhrealitycheck:


"As we reflect on the 41st anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, we recommit ourselves to the decision’s guiding principle: that every woman should be able to make her own choices about her body and her health." - President Barack Obama

Thank you, Mr. President!Read the entire statement here: http://usat.ly/KHNZMd

    rhrealitycheck:

    "As we reflect on the 41st anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, we recommit ourselves to the decision’s guiding principle: that every woman should be able to make her own choices about her body and her health." - President Barack Obama

    Thank you, Mr. President!

    Read the entire statement here: http://usat.ly/KHNZMd

     
  3. I worked at McDonald’s and I spent the money I earned at McDonald’s to get my abortion. I was only fifteen and the person who got me pregnant did not want to give me any money. I was $40 short, so I had my drug dealer call him and threaten him, so he gave me the last $40.

    I really credit it as something that changed my life because I got a job, I took care of my business, and I moved on. And I’m not one of those people who’d have looked back and been like, Oh, that kid would be 30 right now… I don’t think, Oh, I really regret it… Maybe that’s a fucked-up thing to say but, I don’t regret it at all, number one, and number two, it was one of the best things that happened to me. Not actually being on the table and having it done, but feeling like I was responsible for my own life and realizing that when I made mistakes, there were consequences and that I could take care of those consequences. I could make mistakes and I could fix them. And live with them.
     
  4.  
  5. A man who assisted in autopsies in a big urban hospital, starting in the mid-1950s, describes the many deaths from botched abortions that he saw. “The deaths stopped overnight in 1973.” He never saw another in the 18 years before he retired. “That,” he says, “ought to tell people something about keeping abortion legal.”
    — 

    “The Way It Was” — Mother Jones Magazine — Abortion before Roe v. Wade. (via feministteapot)

    Never forget: Roe v. Wade wasn’t the beginning of abortion in America. It was the beginning of the end of illegal abortions. If you haven’t read this piece before, I highly recommend it.

    (via thebicker)

    (Source: gotthatglitteronmyeyes)

     
  6. Slate: Why don’t you just get admitting privileges at a local hospital and comply with the new law?

    Minto: They won’t have me. They are religiously affiliated. So you know, Jesus.

    — Texas abortion doctor, explaining why he can’t perform an abortion procedure unless a woman is “vaginally hemorrhaging.”
     
  7. Many of these bans theorize about when a fetus can feel pain, but what about the real pain my son would have experienced every day of his life? Because as unimaginable as our choice once felt, I made it precisely because I imagined watching, helpless, as he suffered for however long the doctors would have been able to keep a heart “incompatible with life” beating. I imagined enduring as he underwent major bleeds, compromised organ function, developmental delays, and additional surgeries to treat additional complications, only to lose him, very likely long before he was old enough to understand what it was that was happening. It’s hard for me to believe that anyone, knowing what I now know, would make me bring a baby into the world for such an end.
    — Jennifer Pardini, “23 Weeks Pregnant, With ‘No Good Choices’”
     
  8. 12:06 15th Nov 2013

    Notes: 139

    Reblogged from ruhnay

    Tags: reproductive rightsabortion

    image: Download

    ruhnay:

ifundabortions:

Name: Renee Bracey Sherman (and Clark Fluffy Fluffington the Third the Cat)
Location: Ithaca, New York
Abortion Fund: Access Women’s Health Justice and New York Abortion Access Fund
Affiliation: Practical Support Volunteer and Donor
Why I Do This Work: I am proud to fund abortions, be an abortion doula, give rides to clinics, and provide housing to those who have traveled 4-5 hours for an abortion. I do this because I don’t want anyone to have to worry about where they’ll sleep when they travel across the state, decide whether to pay for their abortion or groceries for their family, or to not have anyone to hug them when they need it most. I don’t want anyone to feel as alone or isolated as I did. I want the people who stay with me to know they are loved, respected, and believed that they are experts in their own lives, making the best decision for themselves. I do this work because it’s simply the right thing to do.
To donate or learn more about Access Women’s Health Justice or the New York Abortion Access Fund, visit their websites.

And damn proud of it!

    ruhnay:

    ifundabortions:

    Name: Renee Bracey Sherman (and Clark Fluffy Fluffington the Third the Cat)

    Location: Ithaca, New York

    Abortion Fund: Access Women’s Health Justice and New York Abortion Access Fund

    Affiliation: Practical Support Volunteer and Donor

    Why I Do This Work: I am proud to fund abortions, be an abortion doula, give rides to clinics, and provide housing to those who have traveled 4-5 hours for an abortion. I do this because I don’t want anyone to have to worry about where they’ll sleep when they travel across the state, decide whether to pay for their abortion or groceries for their family, or to not have anyone to hug them when they need it most. I don’t want anyone to feel as alone or isolated as I did. I want the people who stay with me to know they are loved, respected, and believed that they are experts in their own lives, making the best decision for themselves. I do this work because it’s simply the right thing to do.

    To donate or learn more about Access Women’s Health Justice or the New York Abortion Access Fund, visit their websites.

    And damn proud of it!

     
  9. image: Download

    
"We don’t need more ‘what if the mother is going to die?’ debates, we need ‘I had an abortion because I was not ready to be a mother. It was my choice and my right. I own it. Back the fuck up.’" —Neko Case, Salon.com, 1 Sept., 2013

    "We don’t need more ‘what if the mother is going to die?’ debates, we need ‘I had an abortion because I was not ready to be a mother. It was my choice and my right. I own it. Back the fuck up.’" 

    —Neko Case, Salon.com, 1 Sept., 2013

    (Source: thenthwave)

     
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